GCSE 9-1 English Language and Literature here

Xmas Quizzes

Cover Lessons

Blog Archive

Student Room

Useful Materials

AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Poverty

pdodd | Friday January 01, 2016

Categories:

Guide Navigation

  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | How To Use
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Contents of Extracts
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Poverty
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Sport and Entertainment
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Crime and Punishment
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Health
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | War and Espionage
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Working Conditions
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Childhood
  • AQA English Language Non Fiction Reading Anthology | Travel and Exploration

Poverty

19th Century Extracts

A

Two Extracts describing life in the slums of London

In this extract by Margaret Woodhouse, the Victorian workhouses are described:

The Whitechapel Union is a model workhouse; that is to say, it is the Poor Law incarnate in stone and brick. The men are not allowed to smoke in it, not even when they are in their dotage; the young women never taste tea, and the old ones may not indulge in a cup during the long afternoons, only at half-past six o’clock morning and night, when they receive a small hunch of bread with butter scraped over the surface, and a mug of that beverage which is so dear to their hearts as well as their stomachs. The young people never go out, never see a visitor, and the old ones only get one holiday in the month. Then the aged paupers may be seen skipping like lambkins outside the doors of the Bastille, while they jabber to their friends and relations. A little gruel morning and night, meat twice a week, that is the food of the grown-up people, seasoned with hard work and prison discipline. Doubtless this Bastille offers no premium to idle and improvident habits; but what shall we say of the woman, or man, maimed by misfortune, who must come there or die in the street? Why should old...


Please subscribe or log in to access the rest of this resource (including associated media).

This website offers a wealth of enriched content to help you help your students with GCSE English Language and Literature. Please subscribe or log in to access this content.

The content of this site has been produced by teachers and examiners. Edusites have similar support sites for Film and Media called Edusites Film and Edusites Media.

If you would like more information about Edusites English, get in touch using the contact details below.

Kind regards, Richard Gent
Edusites Ltd

[email] admin@edusites.co.uk
[telephone] 01604 847689
[fax] 01604 843220