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ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012

Beth Kemp | Sunday May 13, 2012

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  1. Introduction to ENGA3 Revision Guide
  2. ENGA3 Answering the Language Change Question
  3. ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012
  4. ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  5. ENGA3 Answering the Language Variation Question
  6. ENGA3 Language Variation Question June 2012
  7. ENGA3 Language Variation Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  8. ENGA3 Answering the Discourses Question
  9. ENGA3 Discourses Question June 2012
  10. ENGA3 Discourses Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  11. ENGA3 Exam Practice Feedback

The following points need work to make them full and accurate analytical points in response to the Change question on the two texts about trophy wives.

What is worth keeping in each of these points? Does anything need to be removed or replaced? What could you add to make them decent points?

  1. Both texts address the audience directly, but A does it more like an equal, whereas B uses a numbered list of instructions, which represents the ‘sugar daddies’ as more intelligent, or more grown up, than the ‘trophy wives’.
  2. Both texts use positive adjectives associated with the trophy wives, such as “attractive” (Text A) and “stylish” (Text B).
  3. Text A shows that terms have changed because it says “formerly called ‘arm candy’ and currently called ‘the trophy wife’.
  4. Text B suggests it’s hard to be a trophy wife because it says “shoes ... aren’t easy to fill” and “see if you’ve got what it takes”, suggesting that some people haven’t so not everyone can do it.
  5. One (simplistic) reading of the Sapir-Whorf theory might be said to suggest that ‘language controls thought’, so calling women ‘trophies’ would cause men to treat them like some kind of object. The reflectionist theory suggests that language reflects society, so this would suggest that the language objectifies women because men objectify women.
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