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ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012 Exemplar Response

Beth Kemp | Sunday May 13, 2012

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  1. Introduction to ENGA3 Revision Guide
  2. ENGA3 Answering the Language Change Question
  3. ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012
  4. ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  5. ENGA3 Answering the Language Variation Question
  6. ENGA3 Language Variation Question June 2012
  7. ENGA3 Language Variation Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  8. ENGA3 Answering the Discourses Question
  9. ENGA3 Discourses Question June 2012
  10. ENGA3 Discourses Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  11. ENGA3 Exam Practice Feedback

In both of these texts, the term ‘trophy wife’ is assumed to be a positive thing, associated with good looks and high value material objects. The texts therefore attempt to position the reader as accepting this representation of trophy wives as valuable and high status, however many women (and men) would read this as highly offensive.

The objectification of women is clear from the association in Text A of trophy wives with concrete nouns such as “prize” or “medallion”. These set up a clear and extended metaphor of the wife as an object which the man wins, in recognition of his success. There is no sense of developing a relationship or emotions being involved. Text B, aimed at trophy wives themselves rather than the men seeking such a wife, also associates them with objects such as “shoes” which are “stylish and to die for” and “BMW”.

Text B, probably because its audience is would-be trophy wives, emphasises what such women do, so it does present them in a slightly better light than Text A since it gives them some agency. Both texts use imperatives to direct the reader, but there are differences due to the different audiences of the texts. Text A instructs men with the command: “put some serious thought into how to find the prize”. As part of the complex-compound sentence opening with the fronted subordinate clause “When it is finally time to go out on the prowl,” this instruction casts the man as cunning, emphasising his skills in...


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