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ENGA3 Language Variation Question June 2012 Exemplar Response

Beth Kemp | Sunday May 13, 2012

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  1. Introduction to ENGA3 Revision Guide
  2. ENGA3 Answering the Language Change Question
  3. ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012
  4. ENGA3 Language Change Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  5. ENGA3 Answering the Language Variation Question
  6. ENGA3 Language Variation Question June 2012
  7. ENGA3 Language Variation Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  8. ENGA3 Answering the Discourses Question
  9. ENGA3 Discourses Question June 2012
  10. ENGA3 Discourses Question June 2012 Exemplar Response
  11. ENGA3 Exam Practice Feedback

In this extract, the writer uses various language techniques to represent Ebenezer’s voice and dialect, which helps to portray his character, as well as conveying his memories and views.

The first thing noticed is the syntax. The simple sentence “Fish she was very particular about.”  uses unusual word order for a written sentence, which shows us immediately that the writer is using speech grammar to help us ‘hear’ Ebenezer’s voice. Placing the common noun “fish”, the object of the sentence, before the subject “she” has the effect of emphasising this noun as the topic of that sentence, as well as introducing a topic which the writer is going to stay with for a while. Later in the same paragraph, the writer uses ellipsis to replicate speech:  it got green bones”.  The manipulation of syntax for emphasis is also used elsewhere in the text: “The crab I like best, me,...” and “she had muscles on her arms, my mother”. The latter example suggests pride in his mother’s strength, and the repeated usage of “my mother” and “my father”, using the possessive determiner seems affectionate in its insistence on them belonging to him, as well as polite and respectful.

We can tell from the extract that Ebenezer is an older man, from phrases such as “I have never had a day’s sickness in my life.” and “I’ve eaten orfi all my life and I’m still alive.” This insistence on “all my life” implies that it has been a long life. Also, the references to his...


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