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OCR A2 Unit F663 Guide to John Ford’s ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore’

Sarah Knightley | Friday June 27, 2014

Categories: Archived Resources, KS5 Archive, OCR A Level, OCR A Level Pre-2015 Resources, OCR A Level English Literature, F663, Drama, Tis Pity She's a Whore, Hot Entries, Poetry, Blake, Songs of Innocence and Experience, Writing, Drama Analysis

Guide Navigation

Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson One, Two and Three
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Four, Five and Six
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Seven, Eight and Nine
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Ten, Eleven and Twelve
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Thirteen, Fourteen and Fifteen
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Sixteen, Seventeen and Eighteen
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Nineteen, Twenty and Twenty One

Associated Resources

  • OCR A Level English Literature Specification.pdf

Exemplar Past Paper Questions

Drama Comparisons

  • Christopher Marlowe: Doctor Faustus
  • John Webster: The Duchess of Malfi
  • Richard Brinsley Sheridan: The School for Scandal
  • Aphra Behn: The Rover

Poetry Comparison

  • Geoffrey Chauser: The Pardoner’s Tale
  • John Milton: Paradise Lost Book One
  • John Donne: Selected Poems
  • Alaxander Pope: The Rape of the Lock

Questions

  1. ‘Flawed characters are always more memorable then any moral lesson that literature seeks to draw from them’. In the light of this view, discuss ways in which writers explore the power of fear. In your answer compare one drama text and one poetry text. [30]
  2. ‘Of all the emotions that drive us, fear is the strongest’. In the light of this view, consider ways in which writers explore the power of fear.  In your answer compare one drama text and one poetry text. [30]
  3. ‘The more intense the passion, the more bitter its effects’. In the light of this view, consider ways in which writers explore intense emotion. In your answer compare one drama text and one poetry text. [30]
  4. ‘The pleasures of pursuit are greater then the thrill of conquest’. In the light of this view, discuss ways in which writers present seduction and its consequences. In your answer compare one drama text and one poetry text. [30]
  5. ‘Vanity drives us, and can all too easily destroy us’. In the light of this view, consider ways in which writers explore the power of vanity. In your answer compare one drama text and one poetry text. [30]
  6. ‘By...

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