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Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Thirteen, Fourteen and Fifteen

Sarah Knightley | Wednesday June 26, 2013

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Tis Pity She’s a Whore Introduction
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson One, Two and Three
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Four, Five and Six
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Seven, Eight and Nine
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Ten, Eleven and Twelve
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Sixteen, Seventeen and Eighteen
Tis Pity She’s a Whore Lesson Nineteen, Twenty and Twenty One

Lesson Thirteen

Lesson Objectives

  • Will discuss the importance of the character of Vasques.
  • Will make connections between character and symbolism.
  • Will start to use AO2 as a comparative starting point.

Read Act 4 Scene 3 and complete reading log.

click on image to enlarge

One theatre critic explains in the 2013 Cheek by Jowl production “Spellman’s Vasques drives the plot and drives the play. He is like a microcosm of ‘Tis Pity –everything appears fine, normal, friendly even, but underneath is a seething, mad, black, writhing morass.? and this quotation can be used as an exploration of Vasques’ character. Raymond Powell writes “Vasques’s malignity, although not motiveless, is something of a puzzle, and its origin lies in the not-fully-absorbed influence of Shakespeare’s Iago.? Vasques is important in the role of the revenger and this could lead to further discussion about the theme of revenge in the play. To link further encourage students to consider Vasques as a symbolic character – symbolic of the revenge that drives the plots.

William Blake - Symbolism

Annotate and analyse poems looking at symbolism (this could be with other poems that have been studied). The focus here is on the religious symbolism that has been used and it is this link that can be made with Ford.

The Angel
I dreamt a dream! What can it mean?
And that I was a maiden Queen
Guarded by an Angel mild:
Witless woe was ne’er beguiled!

And I wept both night and day,
And he wiped my tears away;
And I wept both day and night,
And hid from him my heart’s delight....


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