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Viewing entries from category: LITA2

Student Study Guide for Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller »

Mandy Lloyd | Friday May 02, 2014

Categories: KS4, Drama, Death of a Salesman, Hot Entries, Writing, Drama Analysis, AQA A Level English Literature A, LTA1, LITA2, AQA A Level English Literature B, LITB2, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level

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Form - ‘Tragedy’

In classical tragedies, so famous in ancient Greece, the playwright presents a protagonist (a ‘hero figure’) who initially succeeds but then suffers a ‘reversal of fortune’: we watch his fall from grace because he ‘over-reaches’ and dares the gods in some way, angering them and causing them to bring about his downfall. The gods bring the hero to fail because of a human weakness – a ‘fatal flaw’. The audience are brought to pity him as we see that without the flaw, his nobility and...

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Analysing Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre »

Steph Atkinson | Tuesday April 24, 2012

Categories: Hot Entries, Prose, Jane Eyre, Writing, Analytical Writing, Prose Analysis, EDEXCEL A Level English Literature, 6ET01, AQA A Level English Language & Literature A, ELLA1, AQA A Level English Literature A, LITA2, OCR A Level English Literature, F661, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, EDEXCEL A Level, OCR A Level

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Binary Opposition

The way a text creates and shapes its reader’s interpretation to develop both meaning and feeling can be fruitfully and subtly analysed by means of binary opposition. Despite its apparent complexity, this method can easily be understood by students of varying levels and ability from GCSE upwards. It can allow them to create subtle analyses of texts of the kind that can fulfil the requirements of the highest grade bands.

The theory works from the premise that many words and phrases have, as Steve Campsall terms it, their...

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A Guide to Jane Eyre »

Victoria Elliott | Tuesday August 30, 2011

Categories: Hot Entries, Prose, Jane Eyre, EDEXCEL A Level English Literature, 6ET01, AQA A Level English Literature A, LITA2, OCR A Level English Literature, F661, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, EDEXCEL A Level, OCR A Level

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1. ­Overview of Specifications & Assessment Objectives

2. Context

3. Form

4. Characters

5. Themes

6. Setting

7. Language

8. Writing about Jane Eyre




A Teacher’s Guide to A Woman of No Importance »

Christine Sweeney | Monday June 13, 2011

Categories: Drama, A Woman Of No Importance, Hot Entries, EDEXCEL A Level English Literature, 6ET04, AQA A Level English Literature A, LTA1, LITA2, AQA A Level English Literature B, LITB4, OCR A Level English Literature, F664, WJEC A Level English Literature, LT3, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, EDEXCEL A Level, OCR A Level, WJEC A Level

Associated Resources

  • Part 1 - AWONI Teaching Guide.doc
  • Part 2 - AWONI Annotated Guide.docx
  • Part 3 - AWONI Teaching Guide.doc

Why you might like to teach this text!

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A Woman of No Importance is a wonderful text to teach and your students will enjoy studying it.

It is short, it has an absorbing and convincing plot and its themes are easily recognised, interestingly explored and persuasively presented.

On top of this, Wilde is a fine and witty dramatist who uses his chosen form in fascinating ways not only, at the level of plot, to entertain...

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A Level English Literature | Guide to Narrative Analysis »

Steve Campsall | Wednesday March 16, 2011

Categories: Hot Entries, AQA A Level, AQA A Level English Literature A, LTA1, LITA2, LITA3, LITA4, AQA A Level English Literature B, LITB1, LITB2, LITB3, LITB4

Although analysing a text at the level of narrative is a direct requirement of some English Literature courses, such as AQA’s LITB1, it is an analytical technique that can be quite generally applied across many texts – even non-fictional and media texts.

Narrative is a central aspect of imaginative fiction such as short-stories, the novel and many poems but it also crops up in very many everyday texts. Despite this, it remains a less than easy idea to grasp and can easily prove a challenge to even the brightest students. This guide...

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English Literature Frameworks Guide »

Steph Atkinson | Monday September 06, 2010

Categories: EDEXCEL A Level English Literature, 6ET01, 6ET03, 6ET04, AQA A Level English Literature A, LTA1, LITA2, LITA3, LITA4, AQA A Level English Literature B, LITB1, LITB3, LITB4, OCR A Level English Language, OCR A Level English Literature, F661, F664, WJEC A Level English Literature, LT2, LT3, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, EDEXCEL A Level, OCR A Level, WJEC A Level

Guide Navigation

  1. Close Reading & Textual Analysis
  2. Close Analysis
  3. Openings
  4. Characters and Characterisation
  5. Setting, Places and Scenes
  6. Atmosphere, Mood, Tone and Foreshadowing
  7. Dialogue
  8. Description, Imagery, Figurative Language
  9. Irony
  10. Alternative Interpretations
  11. Narrative
  12. Verisimilitude
  13. Time
  14. Symbolism
  15. Context
  16. Genre



Tess of the d’Urbervilles (Thomas Hardy) »

Steph Atkinson | Wednesday August 19, 2009

Categories: Prose, Tess of the D'Urbervilles, Writing, Analytical Writing, Prose Analysis, EDEXCEL A Level English Literature, 6ET03, AQA A Level English Literature A, LTA1, LITA2, LITA3, LITA4, AQA A Level English Literature B, LITB3, OCR A Level English Literature, F661, WJEC A Level English Literature, LT2, KS5 Archive, AQA A Level, EDEXCEL A Level, OCR A Level, WJEC A Level

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Tess of the d’Urbervilles in context

In an ideal world, we would study the whole text with all our students for AS and A2 English Literature. However, we realise that, given the pressures of A level study and teaching, this is not always possible. Therefore, it can be useful to teach using carefully selected extracts which are relevant to the module being studied. This can necessitate just as much preparation on the part of the teacher, who must read the whole text and locate suitable extracts. This guide aims to facilitate this process by...

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