GCSE 9-1 English Language and Literature here

Cover Lessons

Friday Takeaways

Student Room

Useful Materials

Edexcel English Language Unseen Fiction Reading | Travel and Journeys Part 2

pdodd | Friday December 15, 2017

Categories: KS4, EDEXCEL GCSE, Edexcel GCSE English Language 2015, Paper 1: Fiction and Imaginative Writing, Paper 1: Fiction and Imaginative Writing Assessment Pack, Paper 1: Fiction and Imaginative Writing Schemes

 

This resource has been broken into two parts to make it easier for you to cut, paste and edit. Please click on the link below to find the other half of this resource.

  • Edexcel English Language Unseen Fiction Reading | Travel and Journeys Part 1

5

This extract is from Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. In this extract Long John Silver is described.

I remember him as if it were yesterday, as he came plodding to the inn door, his sea-chest following behind him in a hand-barrow—a tall, strong, heavy, nut-brown man, his tarry pigtail falling over the shoulder of his soiled blue coat, his hands ragged and scarred, with black, broken nails, and the sabre cut across one cheek, a dirty, livid white. I remember him looking round the cover and whistling to himself as he did so, and then breaking out in that old sea-song that he sang so often afterwards:

          "Fifteen men on the dead man's chest—
           Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

in the high, old tottering voice that seemed to have been tuned and broken at the capstan bars. Then he rapped on the door with a bit of stick like a handspike that he carried, and when my father appeared, called roughly for a glass of rum. This, when it was brought to him, he drank slowly, like a connoisseur, lingering on the taste and still looking about him at the cliffs and up at our signboard.

"This is a handy cove," says he at length; "and a pleasant sittyated grog-shop. Much company, mate?"

My father told him no, very little company, the more was the pity.

"Well, then," said he, "this is the berth for me. Here you, matey," he cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help up my chest. I'll stay here a bit," he continued. "I'm a plain man; rum and bacon and eggs is what I want, and that head up there for to watch ships off. What you mought call me? You mought call me captain. Oh, I see what you're at—there"; and he threw down three or four gold pieces...


Please subscribe or log in to access the rest of this resource (including associated media).

This website offers a wealth of enriched content to help you help your students with GCSE English Language and Literature. Please subscribe or log in to access this content.

The content of this site has been produced by teachers and examiners. Edusites have similar support sites for Film and Media called Edusites Film and Edusites Media.

If you would like more information about Edusites English, get in touch using the contact details below.

Kind regards, Richard Gent
Edusites Ltd

[email] admin@edusites.co.uk
[telephone] 01604 847689
[fax] 01604 843220