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The Woman in Black | Using Quotations

mandy_lloyd | Monday December 03, 2012

Categories:

Guide Navigation

1. Introduction 
2. Narrative Viewpoint
3. Structure
4. Social / Historical Context
5. Language
6. Top Ten Quotations
7. Exam Preparation
8. Using Quotations
9. Sample Exam Response

The ‘P>E>E’ Technique

When you write about The Woman in Black you might want to try to use the POINT, EVIDENCE and ELABORATE (the ‘P>E>E’ technique):

1. POINT – MAKE A POINT (i.e. a sentence that helps develop an answer to the essay or exam question).

2. EVIDENCE – FIND A SUITABLE QUOTATION TO SUPPORT THE POINT YOU HAVE JUST MADE – keep this short and relevant: be sure it is sufficient to show the examiner how and why your point arose.

3. ELABORATION / EXPLANATION - SHOW WHY THE QUOTATION BROUGHT YOU TO YOUR POINT. YOU MAY WANT TO COMMENT ON ASPECTS OF FORM, STRUCTURE OR LANGUAGE RELATED TO YOUR QUOTATION.

Using The ‘P>E>E’ Technique

1. POINT: Hill describes the way filthy fog permeates every aspect of life. She uses an effective but disgusting simile when depicting the movement of the fog:

2. EVIDENCE: ‘…seething through cracks and crannies like sour breath’ (p24).

3. ELABORATE: This quotation creates a vivid visual image of the fog spreading into every corner of the city but also uses sensory description to show the reader how it stank. This creates a gloomy picture of early twentieth-century London.

You can use quotations in 2 different ways:

  1. Separate quotation: make your point and then back it up with a quotation. Quotations that are longer than 3 words should begin on a new line.
  2. Embedded quotation: this is where the quote runs on from your own words:

The older Kipps looks back at his own ‘priggish’ behaviour as a young man…

Alternatively, you can simply refer to the text (this is especially good if you can’t remember the exact quotation).

Kipps refers to the way Londoners look down on people from the provinces.

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